First ever Synchrotron School for Engineers

Sarah Macdonell, Giorgio Rustighini and Walter Tizzano look at a model of a beamline.
Sarah Macdonell, Giorgio Rustighini and Walter Tizzano look at a model of a beamline.

 

This week, (12-16 November, 2018), the UK’s national synchrotron, Diamond Light Source, is holding the first ever synchrotron engineering school. Specifically aimed at those starting new careers in a range of areas in Light Sources (Synchrotrons) this first course has over 50 engineers from all over the world. Nationalities include Americans, Australians, Brazilians, Canadians, Chinese, Cameroonians, Europeans, Indians, Swedish, Swiss, and Taiwanese engineers.

Sarah Macdonnell, Joint Head of Beamline Engineering at Diamond comments;

Basic as well as innovative, engineering is vital to the successful science carried out in Synchrotrons. However, they often require very different approaches to any previous engineering roles. We have had a terrific response to this course demonstrating that there is a real need for this kind of knowledge sharing. We are particularly pleased to have such a broad range of international delegates and that eleven of them are female. Our goal is to give these engineers a really good insight and grounding into many of the specialist technical issues that arise when designing, building and testing systems for Light Source facilities. 

Pablo Sanchez Navarro, Frankie Bailey and Stewart Scott look at 3D model.
Pablo Sanchez Navarro, Frankie Bailey and Stewart Scott look at 3D model.

 

The five-day course will cover topics such as how to define systems requirements, system design and integration, CE marking, the applications of 3D printing; as well as more specific technical issues such as vibration, heat transfer and thermal stability.

Stewart Scott, Joint Head of Beamline Engineering adds;

Delegates will be learning what really matters in engineering design in Light Sources. For example, when designing a major component in an X-ray beam. They will also be able to see real examples and talk to other engineers about the challenges they face here at Diamond as well as networking and knowledge sharing with engineers from other Light Sources around the globe.

 Overview: Learning outcomes that delegates can expect to take home include:

  • Outline how X-rays are focused and parameters that are used to define the X-ray beam
  • Describe the major components in an X-ray beamline
  • List the technical challenges when designing a major component in an X-ray beamline
  • Give examples of different types of detectors and their characteristics