X-rays: A Clever Characterisation for Smarter Formulation

Jun 19. till Jun 19.

X-rays: A Clever Characterisation for Smarter Formulation

This event provides a perfect platform for formulation scientists to better understand the physical and chemical behaviours of formulations and to explore smart solutions for accelerating processes and controlling performance.

Date
19/06/20182018-06-19 - 19/06/20182018-06-19
Location
Diamond Light Source
URL
Register Here

Overview

X-rays: A Clever Characterisation for Smarter Formulation is the third in a series of events enabling formulation scientists across the UK to share and discuss modern characterisation techniques.  It is jointly organised by Diamond Light Source and the RSC’s Formulation Science and Technology Group
 
The event will cover a range of advanced material characterisation and synchrotron applications. You will hear from experts at Diamond as well a number of industry and academic representatives. Delegates will also have the opportunity to take part in a tour of the world class Diamond facility where you will see a wide range of tools and techniques used to advance formulation research and development.
 

Registration

* Registrations are now closed *
 
A registration fee of £50 is applicable for all attendees.  Refreshments and a catered lunch will be provided. 
 
For any queries please contact industry@diamond.ac.uk 
 

Programme

Time Title Speaker
10.00 Arrival & networking  
10.20 Welcome to Diamond  
Speaker Sessions - What Diamond do
10.30 Probing the Microstructure of Formulations using Small Angle X-ray Scattering Claire Pizzey - Deputy Head of Industrial Liaison, Diamond Light Source
11.00 Spectroscopic techniques for formulations research Sin-Yuen Chang, Industrial Liaison Post Doctoral Research Associate, Diamond Light Source
11.30 Imaging techniques for formulations research Sally Irvine - Industrial Liason Scientist - Imaging, Diamond Light Source
12.00 Lunch  
Speaker Sessions - Applications of Diamond
13.00 Formulation of cellulose-based hydrogels: probing the mechanisms of gelation via Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering and Rheology Julien Schmitt, Post Doctoral Research Associate, University of Bath
13.30 X-ra(y)ted ice cream: Microstructural evolution in a multiphase soft solid Peter Scheutz - Refreshment Discover Measurement Leader, Unilever R&D
14.00 Coffee break  
14.20 Panel Discussion  
14.50 Concluding remarks  
Inside the Synchrotron
15.20 Tour of Diamond  
16.20 Close  
 

Abstracts

Dr. Peter Schuetz, Refreshment Discover Measurement Leader - Unilever R&D 

X-ra(y)ted ice cream: Microstructural evolution in a multiphase soft solid

In Unilever Refreshment Discover we create a sustainable future for the ‘feel good’ experience in ice cream through science and technology.

The in mouth texture as part of the wider sensory experience of ice cream is determined by its microstructure where especially the shape, size and distribution of ice crystals in the matrix phase is of critical importance. These parameters are determined by formulation, processing and thermal history of the sample.
Here we used in situ X-ray tomography to study the evolution of the ice cream structure during temperature oscillations in 3-D.
 

Julien Schmitt, Post Doctoral Research Associate, University of Bath

Formulation of cellulose-based hydrogels: probing the mechanisms of gelation via Small-Angle X-Ray Scattering and Rheology

Cellulose, as the most abundant natural polymer,1 is extensively studied in the formulation of new biodegradable materials,1 as it is biocompatible and environmentally friendly. It can be isolated from various sources (wood pulp, bacteria, tunicates and others) yielding variously shaped particles. Chemical modification allows dispersion of individualised fibrils. Specifically, oxidized cellulose nanofibrils (OCNF), obtained by TEMPO-mediated oxidation of plant or bacterial cellulose,2 present a high negative surface charge making them easy to disperse in water.3 
 
Rheology studies demonstrate that OCNF suspensions have shear-thinning properties and form gels upon concentration (e.g. above 1.5 wt%), or in the presence of additives, such as salts (e.g. NaCl), surfactant or alcohol. Three TEM and SAXS experiments have been performed to describe the shape of the fibrils, found to be rigid cylinders with typically 5 nm cross sections and up to several hundred nm in length. SAXS measurements of suspensions and gels provide a basis for studying the fibril-fibril interactions between OCNF upon concentration or in presence of additives and relate changes in interactions to the rheological behaviour. This leads to a better control of the formulation step to match the desired applications.
 
Dr Sin-Yuen Chang, Post-Doctoral Researcher, Diamond Light Source
 
X-ray Spectroscopy for Formulations
 
X-ray Spectroscopy is a useful and indispensable tool for gaining fundamental understanding of industrial processes, providing complementary and unique information compared with lab-based characterisation techniques. X-ray spectroscopy techniques have been used as a cost and time-efficient way to provide informed decisions to address manufacturing and formulation issues rather than applying a trial-and-error approach. This talk will focus on X-ray absorption and photoelectron spectroscopy. Molecular level information that can be obtained using these techniques include oxidation state, coordination number, ligand type, bond distance and coordination geometry. I will demonstrate some specific examples where X-ray spectroscopy has been used  in the pharmaceutical and fuel additive industries. 
 
Dr Sally Irvine, Industrial Liaison Scientist - Imaging, Diamond Light Source
 
Imaging techniques for formulations research
 
Imaging is one of the easiest synchrotron light techniques to conceptualise, due in large part to our familiarisation with medical x-ray imaging.  Compared to hospital systems, synchrotron facilities can generate x-rays that are up to a trillion times brighter, from a much smaller spot size, which means we can acquire images at much faster speeds, and at higher resolution for smaller length-scales. We can also tune the x-ray energy or wavelength to improve the contrast, and play with distances to bring out the wave-like behaviour of the x-rays, which also yields additional contrast.  Micro-tomography is a 3D imaging technique which simply requires imaging during rotation of the sample. The computer reconstructed result gives us a volume representation of our sample which can then be virtually interrogated. It is ideal for visualising the sample microstructure, allowing us to observe and measure, e.g., cracks, pores, particle distributions, and even cells.  Faster scans mean we can also image the sample over time through dynamic processes, giving us 4D in-situ measurements. Whilst the range of scientific applications is almost unlimited, it is well-suited for answering key questions of industrial manufacturing and formulations issues affecting the product microstructure.

 

Claire Pizzey - Deputy Head of Industrial Liaison, Diamond Light Source

Probing the Microstructure of Formulations using Small Angle X-ray Scattering

The UK’s synchrotron facility, Diamond Light Source, produces X-ray, infra-red and ultraviolet beams of exceptional brightness. The combination of brilliant light and technological platforms is extensively used by the scientific community to undertake structural and chemical investigations of a wide variety of materials on very fast timescales. The industrial user programme at Diamond is continuously growing with over 125 companies from 16 countries now making use of beamlines and offline facilities from formulation industries as diverse as consumer products, pharmaceuticals, foods and oil additives.  
 
A suite of techniques available at Diamond includes small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), electron microscopy, imaging, tomography, infra-red and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The techniques available at the synchrotron can be element specific, with low detection limits, provide very high spatial resolution, employed on very fast timescales or under in situ conditions and in some cases, all of the above. 
 
This talk will focus on the SAXS technique for use in the study of the microstructure of soft matter systems. The technique can be applied to a wide variety of sample types including solutions, powders, suspensions, emulsions and gels and so it is highly relevant to probing physical and chemical behaviours of formulated products in order to enhance product performance. An overview of the SAXS technique will be presented along with illustrative case study examples.