Chris Kelley

profilephoto

Dr Chris Kelley is a Senior Support Scientist on B22.  
Chris joined Diamond in 2014 after working at the Department of Physics, University of York.

Email: chris.kelley@diamond.ac.uk
Tel: +44 (0) 1235 567495

Key Research Area

  • C. S. Kelley, J. Naughton, E. Benson, R. C. Bradley, V. K. Lazarov, S. M. Thompson and J. A. D. Matthew. “Investigating the Magnetic Field Dependent Conductivity in Magnetite Thin Films by Modelling the Magnetorefractive Effect.” J. Phys.: Condens. Matter. 2014, 26, 036002.
     
  • C. S. Kelley, S. M. Thompson, M. D. Illman, S. LeFrançois and P. Dumas. “Spatially Resolving Variations in Giant Magnetoresistance, Undetectable With Four-Point Probe Measurements, Using Infrared Microspectroscopy.” Appl. Phys. Lett. 2012, 101, 162402

Research Expertise

  1. Research Expertise
  2. Collaborators
  3. Publications
  4. Biography
Research Expertise -

Current Research Interests

IR microspectroscopy MRE microspectroscopy AFM IR-AFM Relectivity modelling Magnetism and magnetic materials Spintronics.

Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) is an extremely powerful technique for measuring properties of a material with spatial resolution on the nanoscale. Measurements can be performed in any environement (gas, liquid, vacuum or ambient) on a wide range of samples from across the life sciences and physical sciences. The AFM can be modified to reveal topographic, magnetic, electrical, mechanical and compositional information about samples on the nanoscale. Coupling the AFM to the synchrotron, taking advantage of the unique properties of synchrotron radiation, will lead to exiting new avenues of scientific interest.

My research is primarily in commissioning the AFM as a third end-station for MIRIAM, in addition to the two existing IR microscopes. The spatial resolution for IR microscopy is limited by diffraction. This means that it is impossible to image sub-micron scale objects of interest, such as sub-cellular structures, viruses and catalytic nanoparticles amongst others, using a conventional microscope. The IR-AFM being commissioned is a near-field microscope, so obtaining IR spectra with sub-micron spatial resoltion will be possible.

I am also working on using IR radiation to probe the behaviour of magnetic materials. The reflectivity of a sample is dependent on the conductivity of the constituent materials. In some magnetic materials the conductivity will change in the presence of an external magnetic field, an effect known as magnetoresistance (MR). MR is important technologically and has found particular application in the magnetic storage industry. My project is to use the IR microscopes on MIRIAM to perform spatially resolved non-contact measurements of MR, which is impossible using conventional methods.

Aside from my own research and the group research on the beamline, as a Senior Support Scientist it is my responsibility to facilitate user experiments by providing them with expertise and assistance in using beamline equipment. My key responsibilities are to aid users before their experiments with planning and feasibility, during on the beamline, as well as analysis after the experiment is complete.

Collaborators - +
  • Department of Physics, University of York Working with the Condensed Matter Physics Group on magnetic field-dependent IR spectroscopy of magnetic materials, primarily spin valves and iron oxides for spintronic applications

 

 

 

 

Publications - +
  • C. S. Kelley, J. Naughton, E. Benson, R. C. Bradley, V. K. Lazarov, S. M. Thompson and J. A. D. Matthew. “Investigating the Magnetic Field Dependent Conductivity in Magnetite Thin Films by Modelling the Magnetorefractive Effect.” J. Phys.: Condens. Matter. 2014, 26, 036002.
     
  • C. S. Kelley, S. M. Thompson, M. D. Illman, S. LeFrançois and P. Dumas. “Spatially Resolving Variations in Giant Magnetoresistance, Undetectable With Four-Point Probe Measurements, Using Infrared Microspectroscopy.” Appl. Phys. Lett. 2012, 101, 162402
Biography - +

Chris is currently a Senior Support Scientist on the MIRIAM Beamline (B22) at the Diamond Light Source in Oxfordshire, UK. Chris, who is originally from Leeds, UK, moved to York to study for an MPhys degree in Physics with Astrophysics, graduating in 2010 from the Department of Physics, University of York.

He stayed in York to do a PhD in the Condensed Matter Physics Group within the Department of Physics, working under Prof. Sarah Thompson MBE. During his PhD he visited the SOLEIL synchrotron, where he obtained experience of using synchrotron radiation as a user, as well as briefly visiting the Rijksuniversiteit Groningen to use an unconventional scanning probe microscope. His thesis is titled "Spatially Resolved IR Spectroscopy For Spintronics" and was submitted in February 2014.

Chris started working as a Senior Support Scientist at Diamond, under Gianfelice Cinque on MIRIAM, in March 2014. Chris likes to give outreach talks to the public and was involved in orgainsing many open days for schools/adult learners in York. He is particularly fond of giving his "What It's REALLY Like To Be A Graduate Student Talk", where he attempts to prepare prospective PhD students for the often stressful nature of doctoral study.